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Published, 12/11/13

 

Arizona Cardinals:

·         Against opposing QBs: 207.4 YPG, 1.6 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 18.30 FPG (8th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 52.2 rush YPG, 0.4 rush TDPG, 4.8 receptions PG, 22.2 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 14.64 FPG (fewest )

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.4 RPG, 112.0 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 25.12 FPG (3rd fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.8 RPG, 73.2 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 20.32 FPG (most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Cardinals have been destroyed by TEs, giving up the most points to the position. In Week 11, Jaguars TE’s Danny Noble, Clay Harbor and Marcedes Lewis combined for 117 receiving yards and a TD. In Week 13, Eagles TEs Zach Ertz and Brent Celek combined for 97 receiving yards and three TDs. They’ve given up an amazing 14 TDs to TEs this year, including 6 in their last 5 games.

 

Arizona has done an excellent job against RBs though. In their last four games, they’ve allowed just two TDs to the position. In Week 13, they held LeSean McCoy of the Eagles to just 79 rushing yards. Opposing RBs are averaging just 52.2 rushing yards per contest, the fewest in the NFL. They’ve also given up only 4 TDs total to RBs this year (as runners and receivers) and a team’s RBs have gone over 100 yards only twice all year against them. For the season, they are now giving up the fewest fantasy PPPG to RBs.

 

WRs and QBs are also suffering at the hands of the Cardinals. Arizona is limiting WRs to just 112.0 receiving yards a game, the 2nd fewest. They’ve given up only 8 WR TDs all year and 0 in their last four games.

 

QBs, which are scoring the 8th fewest FPG, are averaging just 207.4 passing yards per game (5th fewest). They’ve given up 3 TDs in three of their last seven games, but they’ve also given up 0-1 passing TDs in four of those last seven games. QBs have only run in 1 TD on the year against the Cardinals, and they’ve yet to give up more than 31 rushing yards to a QB.

 

Next opponent: @ Tennessee

 

Atlanta Falcons:

·         Against opposing QBs: 252.8 YPG, 1.6 TDPG, 0.2 INTPG, 21.22 FPG (16th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 151.6 rush YPG, 1.2 rush TDPG, 5.2 receptions PG, 34.6 receiving YPG, 0.4 receiving TDPG, 33.42 FPG (2nd most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.4 RPG, 154.0 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 29.40 FPG (10th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.0 RPG, 63.6 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 14.96 FPG (7th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Falcons have allowed the 4th most rushing yards per game over the last five weeks (151.6). In Week Ten, Seahawks RB Marshawn Lynch went beast mode on Atlanta and rushed for 145 yards and a TD. In Week Eleven, Bucs RB Bobby Rainey rushed for 163 yards and two TDs. Additionally, Bills’ RBs totaled 192 yards, 2 TDs and 49.5 FP in Week Thirteen.

 

TEs are also playing well against the Falcons, scoring the 7th most FPG. Atlanta is allowing the 8th most yards per game (63.6) and the 10th most receptions per game (5.5) to the position. However, this stat is somewhat skewed, as the Falcons allowed over 25 FP to the New Orleans’ and Green Bay TEs in Weeks Twelve and Fourteen, but kept the position to under 4.0 FP in Weeks Ten and Eleven.

 

The Falcons defense has been decent against WRs lately, allowing just 1 TD to the position over the past four weeks, and their 10th-fewest average would be even better if not for a 14/257/2 outing by the Seahawks WRs in Week Ten. They’ve been middle-of-the-pack against QBs but are coming off back-to-back outings in which the opposing QB didn’t pass for more than a single TD.

 

Next opponent: vs. Washington

 

Baltimore Ravens:

·         Against opposing QBs: 227.8 YPG, 1.4 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 18.14 FPG (7th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 86.6 rush YPG, 0.4 rush TDPG, 4.8 receptions PG, 34.0 receiving YPG, 0.4 receiving TDPG, 21.66 FPG (13th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.8 RPG, 143.0 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 32.18 FPG (14th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 3.8 RPG, 50.8 YPG, 0.0 TDPG, 8.88 FPG (2nd fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Ravens have been slightly above average in most categories. They’ve held RBs to under 20 FP in 2 of their last 5 games and have only allowed one team to breach the 100-rushing-yard mark. Baltimore is allowing the 2nd fewest FPG per game to TEs while shutting them out of the end zone. In fact, no TE has caught more than 4 passes in 4 of their last 5 games.

 

Baltimore has also done well limiting the yardage to opposing QBs, just 227.8 (8th fewest in the league). None of the last five QBs to face the Ravens have thrown for 300 yards, however they have allowed multiple TD passes in 3 of their previous 5 games, and while they did limit a QB to 8.3 FP in Week Twelve, that QB was Geno Smith.

 

Against WRs they’ve been in the middle of the pack but they did have a setback in Week Fourteen when they allowed Vikings WR Cordarrelle Patterson to catch five balls for 141 yards and a TD.

 

Next opponent: @ Detroit

 

Buffalo Bills:

·         Against opposing QBs: 192.0 YPG, 1.3 TDPG, 1.5 INTPG, 15.03 FPG (3rd fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 135.0 rush YPG, 1.5 rush TDPG, 3.8 receptions PG, 17.3 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 27.98 FPG (8th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 9.8 RPG, 142.0 YPG, 0.5 TDPG, 27.68 FPG (8th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 3.3 RPG, 32.8 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 11.03 FPG (8th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Bills have done a great job limiting QBs over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Twelve). Buffalo is allowing just 192.0 passing yards per game, the 2nd fewest in the league. More impressively, only one QB, Matt Ryan, has scored over 20.0 FP in that span. They’ve also picked off the QB 6 times in the last 5 weeks.

 

TEs are also being shut down by the Bills. They’ve allowed just 13 receptions total over the past four games to the position, and only the Falcons TEs managed over 50 yards. However, they have allowed a TD to the position in each of the last 3 games, and TEs have also been in double digit FP in those games as well.

 

WRs have scored just two TDs in the last four contests and the Bills have been stingy against WRs in generally, but a big hiccup came in Week Thirteen, when Atlanta’s WRs amassed 18/232 for 41.2 FP. On the other hand, RBs are really frustrating Buffalo. In the last 5 weeks, all four teams the Bills have faced have reached over 100 yards, and the Bills have allowed a TD in each of those games. In Week Thirteen, they allowed 3 TDs to the Falcons. The 135 rushing yards the Bills are allowing per game are the 5th most in the NFL.

 

Next opponent: @ Jacksonville

 

Carolina Panthers:

·         Against opposing QBs: 238.0 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 17.92 FPG (5th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 66.8 rush YPG, 0.2 rush TDPG, 6.0 receptions PG, 40.0 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 17.88 FPG (6th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 11.8 RPG, 159.0 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 31.38 FPG (13th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.4 RPG, 39.2 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 11.92 FPG (11th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

In Week Fourteen the Panthers defense hit a little bit of a stumbling block when they faced the New Orleans Saints, but overall they have been very good the last five weeks of the season. Two of the last five QBs have thrown for 300+ passing yards (Saints QB Drew Brees threw for 313 in Week 14) but they’ve also limited two of the other three QBs they faced to less than 200 passing yards.

 

WRs are scoring the 13th fewest FPG against the Panthers. In Week Fourteen, Saints WR Marques Colston racked up 125 yards and two TDs, but outside of that performance, the Panthers have been excellent shutting down opposing WRs, as the only teams whose WRs reached double digit receptions were those quarterbacked by Drew Brees, Tom Brady, and Ryan Tannehill.

 

The run defense has been the biggest bright spot for the Panthers. Carolina has allowed just one rushing TD to the position over the last five weeks, however that game (against NE) in general was a big hiccup for their run defense, as they allowed 104 rushing yards and 64 receiving yards to RBs. Aside from that Week Eleven game, no team in the last 5 weeks has broken 20.0+ FP from their RBs.

 

Before Week Fourteen against the Saints, the Panthers defense was money against TEs, holding their own against the likes of Vernon Davis and Rob Gronkowski and allowing just one team to reach double digits in FP from their TEs. Their 11th-fewest rank would be even better if not for the Saints’ TEs’ output of 7/78/2 for 26.8 FP.

 

Next opponent: @ St. Louis

 

Chicago Bears:

·         Against opposing QBs: 195.0 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 17.26 FPG (4th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 182.0 rush YPG, 0.8 rush TDPG, 2.6 receptions PG, 10.6 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 26.66 FPG (12th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 9.4 RPG, 117.8 YPG, 1.4 TDPG, 33.90 FPG (16th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.4 RPG, 66.6 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 13.46 FPG (14th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks opposing QBs have really suffered at the hands of the Bears. Chicago is allowing just 195.0 passing yards per game, the 3rd fewest in the league. In addition, three of the last five QBs to face the Bears have been limited to a single passing TD. In the past four weeks, no QB has totaled above 20.0 FP, however they were facing the likes of Joe Flacco, Kellen Clemens, and Christian Ponder.

 

RBs on the other hand have had no problem racking up yardage. In Week Twelve, Rams RB Benny Cunningham ran for 109 yards. In Week Thirteen, Vikings RB Adrian Peterson ran for 211 yards. Cowboys RB DeMarco Murray rushed for 146 in Week Fourteen. Overall, opposing RBs are averaging 182 rushing yards per game, by far the most in the league. Only one team in the past 5 weeks against the Bears have had a rushing attack score under 20.0 FP.

 

Against TEs and WRs the Bears have been in the middle of the pack. No team has had their TEs catch more than 5 balls against them in the past 5 weeks, however, they have allowed a TD to the position in 2 of their previous 3 games. Although the Bears are allowing the 16th-most FPG against WRs, that stat is partially due to their Week Thirteen game, in which Vikings WRs went for 14/211/1 for 49.8 FP.

 

Next opponent: @ Cleveland

 

Cincinnati Bengals:

·         Against opposing QBs: 241.5 YPG, 2.0 TDPG, 1.5 INTPG, 21.53 FPG (13th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 70.8 rush YPG, 0.0 rush TDPG, 9.3 receptions PG, 60.8 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 22.40 FPG (14th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 9.3 RPG, 129.3 YPG, 1.5 TDPG, 31.18 FPG (12th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 6.3 RPG, 51.5 YPG, 0.5 TDPG, 14.40 FPG (9th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Twelve) the Bengals fantasy defense has been pretty average but there are a few things worth pointing out. Even though opposing RBs haven’t scored against the Bengals in their past 5 weeks, they are having some success in the passing game. Cincy is giving up 60.8 receiving yards per game against the position, the 4th most. Cleveland RBs caught 13 passes for 75 yards against them in Week Eleven, which totaled 30.7 FP—the most points the Bengals have allowed to RBs in a game all season long.

 

TEs are averaging 6.3 catches per game, the 3rd most in the league and are giving up the 9th most FPG to the position, but mainly because of their Week Thirteen performance against Antonio Gates and Ladarius Green, when the Bengals allowed 21.6 FP to the TE. Other than that outing, no team’s TEs have gone for more than 50 yards in the past 5 weeks.

 

Cincinnati is giving up the 13th most FPG to QBs but their ranking would be better if not for a 326 yard 4 TD performance by Colts QB Andrew Luck in Week Fourteen. They’ve actually had six INTs in the past five weeks and haven’t allowed any QB aside from Luck, including Philip Rivers and Ryan Tannehill, to surpass 20.0 FP.

 

Next opponent: @ Pittsburgh

 

Cleveland Browns:

·         Against opposing QBs: 230.8 YPG, 2.3 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 20.50 FPG (15th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 99.3 rush YPG, 0.3 rush TDPG, 6.8 receptions PG, 76.8 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 26.95 FPG (10th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 11.8 RPG, 117.0 YPG, 1.5 TDPG, 32.65 FPG (15th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.3 RPG, 45.3 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 14.78 (8th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Browns are allowing the 10th most FPG to RBs over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Ten) but their ranking is a result of the beating they took at the hands of the Patriots. In Week Fourteen, New England RBs amassed an amazing 218 receiving yards against Cleveland. In the 3 previous games the Browns hadn’t allowed more than 41 receiving yards to the position, and in the previous four, no team’s RBs totaled over 20.0 FP.

 

Opposing TEs have scored four TDs over the last five weeks but those four came in 2 games; thus, the Browns haven’t allowed a TE to score in 3 of their previous 5. TEs have been largely ineffective in terms of yardage, averaging just 45.3 yards per game (9th fewest in the NFL), and no team’s TE has totaled above 50 yards Cleveland has also done well limiting the yardage thrown by QBs.

 

Opposing passers are averaging just 230.8 yards per game, the 10th fewest over the past five weeks, but most impressive is that only Joe Flacco and Tom Brady were able to reach 20.0 FP against the Browns. On the flip side, the Browns have allowed multiple TD passes by QBs in every game since Week Six.

 

The team has been quite average against WRs in the past five weeks, however it could be worse, as 2 of Andy Dalton’s 3 TD passes in Week Eleven went to TEs, and Cincy’s WRs totaled just 6/33/1.

 

Next opponent: @ New England

 

Dallas Cowboys:

·         Against opposing QBs: 292.3 YPG, 2.5 TDPG, 0.3 INTPG, 26.45 FPG (3rd most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 158.5 rush YPG, 1.5 rush TDPG, 7.8 receptions PG, 57.3 receiving YPG, 1.0 receiving TDPG, 42.83 FPG (most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 11.5 RPG, 168.5 YPG, 1.3 TDPG, 37.55 FPG (9th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.5 RPG, 48.5 YPG, 0.3 TDPG, 10.85 FPG (7th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Eleven) Dallas has allowed two QBs to throw for more than 340 yards and four passing TDs each, including a 35.4 FP performance by Drew Brees and a 41.0 FP performance by Josh McCown. In Weeks Twelve and Thirteen, when the Cowboys defense allowed just 16.7 and 12.7 FP, the opponents were far inferior.

 

Yet as a result of opposing QBs relative success against the Cowboys, WRs are averaging 186.5 yards per game, the 7th most in the league. They’ve gone above 200 yards in 3 of their last 4 games and have had double-digit receptions in all but two games this entire season.

 

The Cowboys woes don’t end there though. They’ve been awful against RBs too. Dallas has allowed RBs to breach the 100-yard mark in 4 of their last 5 games, 200 yards in 2 of their last 4, and has given up nine TDs to the position in that span. In Week Ten against the Saints, they gave up a whopping 244 yards rushing with 3 TDs along with 16/115/2 receiving to RBs, totaling what is quite possibly a fantasy football record 81.9 FP. Even when they don’t give up TDs on the ground to RBs, the position still either gains massive yardage or scores through the air.

 

On the bright side, the Cowboys have done a good job limiting TEs. They’ve allowed just one TD to the position in their last four games and no TE has even come close to 100-yards in that span, the highest being 64 yards from New Orleans in Week Ten.

 

Next opponent: vs. Green Bay

 

Denver Broncos:

·         Against opposing QBs: 251.4 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 0.4 INTPG, 21.96 FPG (10th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 107.0 rush YPG, 1.2 rush TDPG, 5.4 receptions PG, 36.6 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 28.16 FPG (7th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 12.4 RPG, 155.8 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 33.98 FPG (15th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.8 RPG, 59.0 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 14.30 FPG (10th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Broncos have really struggled recently keeping RBs under control. In their last five games Denver has given up seven TDs while allowing 5.4 receptions per game (10th most) to the position—though 3 of those 7 TDs came in Week Fourteen against the Titans. Additionally, RBs have broken the 100-yard mark in 3 of their last 5 games and have totaled at least 29.0 FP in 4 of their last 5.

 

QBs have also played well against Denver, putting up the 10th most FPG in their last five games, but in Weeks Ten and Fourteen, Philip Rivers and Ryan Fitzpatrick were both held under 20.0 FP. Nevertheless, QBs have tossed for multiple TDs in 3 of their last 5 games.

 

They’ve been average against the WR position but it’s worth mentioning that they are allowing 12.2 receptions a game, 10th most in the league, including New England’s 18 receptions and Kansas City’s 16 in Weeks Twelve and Thirteen. WRs have also caught at least 1 TD in four of their last five.

 

TEs scored TDs against Denver in three straight games, from Week Eleven to Thirteen, and their 10th most average could be worse if not for a 2/2/0 output from Tennessee’s TEs in Week Fourteen.

 

Next opponent: vs. San Diego

 

Detroit Lions:

·         Against opposing QBs: 248.8 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 0.6 INTPG, 21.28 FPG (15th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 82.6 rush YPG, 0.6 rush TDPG, 3.4 receptions PG, 24.6 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 18.92 FPG (7th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.0 RPG, 181.2 YPG, 1.6 TDPG, 37.48 FPG (10th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.8 RPG, 43.0 YPG, 0.0 TDPG, 9.10 FPG (3rd fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Lions have played very well against opposing RBs. They’ve allowed four TDs while limiting the position to the 3rd fewest receptions (3.4) and the 7th fewest receiving yards (24.6), including single digit performances in two of the last five games. Their 7th-fewest stat would be even better if not for LeSean McCoy and the Eagles’ 286/3 rushing performance in Week Fourteen.

 

They’ve also done very well against the TE position allowing the 3rd fewest FPG despite allowing 8th most receiving yards per game (43.0). In their previous five games, no TE has scored a TD and in four of those games, no TE has totaled double-digit FP.

 

WRs have been an issue however, scoring the 10th most FPG the last five weeks. In Week Twelve, Bucs WR Tiquan Underwood caught two TDs and amassed 108 yards on just three receptions. Additionally, the Lions have allowed at least 150 yards receiving to WRs in three of their last five games and over 200 yards in Weeks Ten and Eleven. However since Week Eleven’s 14/235/3 performance by the Pittsburgh WRs, no WR corps has totaled over 9 receptions in a game.

 

The Lions only real hiccup against QBs in their last five games was against Pittsburgh’s Ben Roethlisberger, who passed for 367 yards and 4 TDs. Since then, no QB has passed for more than 250 yards or totaled higher than 22.0 FP.

 

Next opponent: vs. Baltimore

 

Green Bay Packers:

·         Against opposing QBs: 255.2 YPG, 2.0 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 21.60 FPG (12th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 154.4 rush YPG, 0.8 rush TDPG, 5.2 receptions PG, 46.0 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 31.24 FPG (4th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 12.2 RPG, 182.4 YPG, 1.6 TDPG, 40.52 FPG (4th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 2.6 RPG, 26.8 YPG, 0.2 TDPG, 6.48 FPG (fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Packers have played well against TEs the last five weeks limiting the position to 26.8 yards a game (fewest) while allowing them to get in to the end zone just once. Additionally, only the Atlanta TEs scored double-digit FP against them and that was a result of a TD, as they only totaled 25 yards. Before that game, the Packers hadn’t allowed a TE TD since Week Seven, and they’ve allowed just 13 receptions total to the position over their past 5 games.

 

The running game has been a different story however. Opposing RBs are averaging 154.4 rushing yards per game against Green Bay, the 3rd most in the league, and they allowed 200+ yards rushing in back to back weeks. In Week Twelve, Viking RB Adrian Peterson racked up 146 yards and a TD. In Week Thirteen, Lions RB Reggie Bush rushed for 117 yards and a TD. Finally, RBs are making at least 5 receptions in 4 of their last 5 games, including 9 receptions to Detroit RBs and 6 to Atlanta RBs.

 

They’ve also suffered against WRs, allowing 8 TDs while allowing the 7th most receiving yards to the position in the last five contests, including 3 games of allowing 200+ receiving yards to the position. Against the Lions in Week Thirteen, they allowed 12/220/3 receiving for 54.4 FP—their worst points allowed total of the season since Week Two.

 

While they haven’t been great against QBs, the Lions have actually limited opposing QBs to fewer than 20.0 FP in 3 of their last 5 games, including last week against Atlanta’s Matt Ryan. They haven’t been awful yardage-wise either, as only one QB, Matthew Stafford, has thrown for more than 300 yards since Week Six. The problem is TDs: they’ve allowed 10 TDs to QBs in their last 5.

 

Next opponent: @ Dallas

 

Houston Texans:

·         Against opposing QBs: 233.0 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 0.4 INTPG, 19.48 FPG (11th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 115.6 rush YPG, 0.8 rush TDPG, 5.0 receptions PG, 44.8 receiving YPG, 0.4 receiving TDPG, 28.24 FPG (6th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 11.4 RPG, 126.4 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 30.10 FPG (11th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.2 RPG, 66.0 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 15.60 FPG (5th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Texans have been abused by opposing RBs. Not only are they giving up 115.6 rushing yards (9th most) but they’re also giving up 44.8 receiving yards a game (9th most) to the position. They’ve allowed 100 yards rushing to the position in 4 of their last 5 games, and although NE RBs totaled just 88 yards on the ground, they found the EZ twice on the ground and once in the air, posting 40.5 FP, the worst allowance of the season by the Texans.

 

Houston has also struggled against TEs, giving up four TDs and the 6th most receiving yards (66.0). If not for Jacksonville’s performance by their TEs in Week Twelve, when they totaled just 2/26 receiving, the Texans would be worse statistically, as they’ve allowed a TD to the position in 4 of their last 5.

 

They’re doing well against WRs though, giving up the 8th fewest receiving yards to the position and holding them to a single TD or no TDs in 4 of their last five. QBs also have been nothing spectacular against the Texans recently, as no QB except Tom Brady in Week Thirteen has gone above 22.0 FP in the last 5 weeks against them. They’ve been pretty stingy against QB passing yardage, but have given up a total of 9 TDs in 4 of their last 5.

 

Next opponent: @ Indianapolis

 

Indianapolis Colts:

·         Against opposing QBs: 251.8 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 0.6 INTPG, 24.06 FPG (6th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 119.8 rush YPG, 1.2 rush TDPG, 4.2 receptions PG, 30.4 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 27.62 FPG (9th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 11.0 RPG, 174.4 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 35.74 FPG (11th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.0 RPG, 47.8 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 12.18 FPG (13th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five games the Colts passing defense has given up the 6th most FPG to the QB position. Just one of the last five QBs who faced Indianapolis have thrown for more than 300 passing yards but they’ve allowed nine passing TDs during that span. They’ve also allowed rushing TDs in back to back games against the position and have failed to intercept the QB in 4 of their last 5.

 

WRs are averaging 174.4 receiving yards per game against the Colts, the 10th most in the NFL. In Week Ten, Rams rookie WR Tavon Austin had a breakout game when he put up 138 yards and two TDs. In Week Eleven, Cardinals WR Michael Floyd racked up 104 receiving yards. Interestingly enough, the Colts defense has allowed either 2 TDs or no TDs to the position in the pass five weeks, a sign of their up-and-down November and early December.

 

Opposing RBs have also done well against Indy, scoring seven TDs while averaging 119.8 rushing yards a week (7th most). They have found the EZ in each of the last 5 games, including 6 TDs on the ground and one in the air. Additionally, the RB numbers are steadily increasing, totaling 22.4 FP in Week Eleven, 27.6 in Week Twelve, and 35.6 in Week Fourteen.

 

The Colts’ defense has been very inconsistent against the TE position. In three of the last five weeks, TEs haven’t scored more than 10 FP. In those other two games, however, Titan TEs teed off for 10/91/1 for 25.1 FP in Week Eleven and Bengal TEs totaled 8/61/1 for 20.1 FP in Week Fourteen.

 

Next opponent: vs. Houston

 

Jacksonville Jaguars:

·         Against opposing QBs: 320.6 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 1.2 INTPG, 25.54 FPG (4th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 59.8 rush YPG, 0.4 rush TDPG, 5.6 receptions PG, 30.2 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 17.00 FPG (3rd fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.6 RPG, 210.4 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 41.84 FPG (2nd most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 6.8 RPG, 77.8 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 18.18 FPG (3rd most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

In their last five games the Jaguars have been gurrific against the running game, as no RB has reached 100-yards, and only two RB attacks have totaled over 50 yards. The Jags have held the position to under 20.0 FP in 4 of their last 5 games because of this, however RBs are getting their fair share through the air, as the Jags have allowed at least 5 receptions to the position in 4 of their last 5 and 28 total receptions.

 

Unfortunately they’ve completely sucked against the pass. Jacksonville has allowed the 4th most FPG to QBs over the last five weeks. Three of the last four QBs who have faced the Jags have thrown for 350+ passing yards. They’ve also thrown nine TDs during that time span. It would be even worse if not for the abysmal Texans in Week Twelve, when Case Keenum looked very human—totaling 8.7 FP.

 

TEs have done well against the Jags defense, scoring the 3rd most FPG against the Jaguars. Over the last five weeks TEs have scored three TDs while averaging 77.8 receiving yards a game, the most in the league. Additionally, TEs have totaled over 20.0 FP in 3 of the last 5 weeks against the Jags, though they did hold Jordan Cameron in check in Week Thirteen.

 

The Jags are playing well against RBs though, allowing just two TDs over the last four games while limiting the position to the 3rd fewest rushing yards per game. Additionally, no rushing attack has totaled 100 yards and only the Browns peaked the 20.0 FP mark over the last 5 games.

 

Next opponent: vs. Buffalo

 

Kansas City Chiefs:

·         Against opposing QBs: 335.3 YPG, 2.5 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 27.45 FPG (most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 94.5 rush YPG, 1.0 rush TDPG, 4.3 receptions PG, 37.8 receiving YPG, 0.5 receiving TDPG, 26.48 FPG (13th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 15.3 RPG, 249.3 YPG, 1.3 TDPG, 47.68 FPG (most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 3.5 RPG, 48.3 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 12.83 FPG (16th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Chiefs fantasy defense has been awful over the last five weeks, a far cry from the first half of the season. Opposing QBs have thrown for more than 320 passing yards in three of the last four games. In fact the Chiefs have allowed the most passing yards per game and the most passing TDs per game over the last five weeks.

 

Kansas City is also struggling against WRs, yielding 15.3 receptions per game, 2nd most in the league and the most receiving yards per game (249.3). This, however, is partially due to the 15/322/4 outburst for 71.2 FP by the Broncos stud receivers in Week Thirteen. Additionally, receivers have put up at least 150 receiving yards in four straight weeks.

 

It’s not just the passing game that’s hurting the Chiefs though. RBs are scoring the 13th most FPG against Kansas City. In three of their last four games, the position has totaled at least 27.0 FP, including 40.7 FP by Ryan Mathews and Danny Woodhead in Week Twelve. They’d be looking even worse, if not for the hapless Redskins in Week Thirteen.

 

Next opponent: @ Oakland

 

Miami Dolphins:

·         Against opposing QBs: 213.6 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 18.00 FPG (6th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 109.4 rush YPG, 0.2 rush TDPG, 4.2 receptions PG, 31.4 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 19.48 FPG (10th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 8.8 RPG, 124.6 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 24.86 FPG (2rd fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.4 RPG, 57.4 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 12.54 FPG (14th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Miami has done an excellent job against WRs the last five weeks, allowing the 5th fewest receiving yards in the league while giving up just 3 TDs, all of which were scored by Pittsburgh in Week Fourteen. In fact, aside from that game, WRs have scored just 1 TD against the Dolphins all season. Before the 14/256/3 burst by Pittsburgh WRs, the Dolphins hadn’t allowed a receiving corps to reach 22.0 FP in the previous 4 games, and only one team in that span, the Panthers in Week Twelve, had double-digit receptions by their receivers.

 

The Dolphins have also done well against QBs limiting all but one (Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger in Week Fourteen) to less than 300 passing yards. They’ve held QBs to under 200 passing yards in three of their last 5 and have totaled 5 INTs in that span, 2 coming against Geno Smith and the hapless Jets.

 

The oppositions’ running game hasn’t fared much better. Miami has given up just one TD to the position in their last five contests and have allowed just 2 teams to reach the 100-yard rushing plateau. In their last three games, opponents’ rushing attacks, including Le’Veon Bell, haven’t been able to reach 18.0 FP.

 

Next opponent: vs. New England

 

Minnesota Vikings:

·         Against opposing QBs: 286.6 YPG, 2.2 TDPG, 0.6 INTPG, 26.90 FPG (2nd most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 117.6 rush YPG, 0.6 rush TDPG, 5.0 receptions PG, 40.0 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 25.56 FPG (14th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.0 RPG, 195.4 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 39.66 FPG (5th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.2 RPG, 51.4 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 15.14 FPG (6th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Vikings have really struggled defending the pass. Three of the last five QBs they faced have thrown for more than 280 passing yards. They’ve also allowed 11 TDs during that time, in addition a rushing TD in Week Twelve. Aside from Russell Wilson in Week Eleven, QBs have totaled at least 25.0 FP against the Vikings over their last 5 games.

 

WRs have also done well against Minnesota averaging 13.0 receptions per game, 6th most in the NFL. In four of their past five games, the Vikings have allowed 13 receptions to receivers, including a 18/311/2 performance at the hands of Alshon Jeffery and Brandon Marshall in Week Thirteen. Additionally, WRs have scored at least 1 TD in every game this season against the Vikings since Week Two.

 

Even TEs are getting in on the act. Minnesota is giving up the 8th most receptions to the position (5.3 receptions per game). They have allowed double-digit FP to the TE in 3 of their last 5 games, including against Dennis Pitta’s return in Baltimore.

 

It’s not just the passing game giving them issues though; they’ve been below average against RBs too. The Vikings are allowing 117.6 rushing yards per game to the opposition, the 8th most in the NFL. However, while allowing over 30.0 FP to the position in Weeks Eleven and Twelve, the run defense has been better in the last 2 weeks, keeping opponents under 20.0 FP.

 

Next opponent: vs. Philadelphia

          

New England Patriots:

·         Against opposing QBs: 255.5 YPG, 2.0 TDPG, 0.5 INTPG, 24.65 FPG (5th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 120.8 rush YPG, 1.0 rush TDPG, 3.8 receptions PG, 22.8 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 24.10 FPG (16th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.5 RPG, 155.8 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 32.93 FPG (16th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 6.3 RPG, 77.0 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 19.95 FPG (2nd most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Patriots have given up the 9th most passing yards to QBs their biggest problem against the position has been the 8 passing TDs they’ve allowed over their last four games. Even Browns QB Jason Campbell scorched them for 3 TDs in Week Fourteen.

 

TEs have also abused New England. The Pats are surrendering 77.0 receiving yards (2nd most) and 6.3 receptions a game (2nd most) to the position. This stat, however, is partially skewed by their performance against Cleveland in Week Fourteen, when Jordan Cameron and the Cleveland TEs put up 11/170/2 for 40.0 FP. Before then, no TE crew had gone over 55 yards receiving in the past 5 weeks.

 

New England has been in the middle of the pack against RBs but it could be worse if not for an abysmal rushing performance from Carolina in Week Eleven, when they posted just 7.2 FP. Denver’s rushing attack got them for 280 yards and a TD, followed by Houston’s 115/3 performance in Week Thirteen. And while they held Cleveland RBs in check on the ground in Week Fourteen, the RBBC there still managed 8 receptions.

 

The team’s 16th-fewest stat against WRs could actually be better, as they’ve held receiving corps to under 150 yards in three of their last four games, but Andre Johnson and Houston put up 11/225 on them in Week Thirteen. Additionally, they’ve given up 4 TDs to the position over that span.

 

Next opponent: @ Miami

 

New Orleans Saints:

·         Against opposing QBs: 203.4 YPG, 1.4 TDPG, 0.2 INTPG, 18.38 FPG (9th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 77.6 rush YPG, 0.4 rush TDPG, 4.4 receptions PG, 35.4 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 19.30 FPG (8th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.0 RPG, 116.4 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 26.40 FPG (5th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.8 RPG, 51.8 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 13.36 FPG (15th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Rob Ryan’s defense is playing incredible football right now. Opposing QBs are averaging just 203.4 passing yards per game against the Saints over the last five weeks, the 3rd fewest in the league. Only one QB, Russell Wilson, has gone over 17.0 FP in that span, and the Saints defense has held opposing QBs to under 200 yards in three of the previous five weeks.

 

WRs are averaging just 116.4 yards per game, the 3rd fewest in the NFL. Additionally, they’ve allowed just 4 TDs to the position over the last five weeks, and receiving corps haven’t gone over 11 receptions in four of the last five weeks against the Saints.

 

New Orleans is also holding their own against the RB position. The Saints are giving up the 7th fewest rushing yards per game and have held the position to just three TDs. In the last three games, however, RBs are getting it done through the air, as Atlanta’s RBs posted 7/66 in Week Twelve and Seattle’s posted 5/41/1 in Week Thirteen. Nevertheless, only 2 teams’ rushing attacks have broken 20.0 FP against the Saints.

 

They’ve held TEs in check for the most part, despite their 15th-most statistic, as San Fran’s TEs posted 5/43/1 for 15.3 FP in Week Eleven and Seattle’s TEs posted 6/88/1 for 20.8 FP in Week Thirteen thanks to a long reception by Zach Miller.

 

Next opponent: @ St Louis

 

New York Giants:

·         Against opposing QBs: 233.4 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 20.02 FPG (13th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 82.0 rush YPG, 0.6 rush TDPG, 6.0 receptions PG, 61.0 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 25.10 FPG (15th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 10.8 RPG, 130.0 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 26.58 FPG (6th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 3.8 RPG, 42.4 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 11.64 FPG (10th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Giants defense has been pretty good over the last five weeks. In their previous five games opposing QBs have thrown six TDs but are averaging just 233.4 passing yards per game (12th fewest). Also, those 6 TDs have come in the last 3 weeks, when the team was facing actual NFL starters such as Tony Romo and Philip Rivers, whereas the defense held their own against the likes of Scott Tolzien and a banged up Terrelle Pryor.

 

New York has been slightly above average in terms of receiving yards and receptions allowed to WRs but what’s most impressive is the fact that they’ve limited the position to just two TDs in the last five games. The only big blip in the radar came against Green Bay in Week Twelve, when their receivers posted 16/263 for 42.3 FP. Against teams with running QBs such as Pryor and Robert Griffin, they’ve been solid against receivers, holding both to under 100 yards.

 

The G-Men have also been pretty good against TEs limiting the position to the 7th fewest receptions per game. They’ve allowed just 3 TDs to the position over the past 5 games and 2 of those came against Dallas in Week Twelve. Additionally, they’ve held opposing TEs to under 10.0 FP in three of their previous five games.

 

Though they have been a middle of the pack team against RBs over the last five weeks, the last three weeks have been a different story, allowing over 20.0 FP to the position in each game, including a drubbing by San Diego’s rushing attack in Week Fourteen, when they allowed 146 yards and a TD on the ground in addition to 8/97/1 receiving for 44.3 FP.

 

Next opponent: vs. Seattle

 

New York Jets:

·         Against opposing QBs: 307.8 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 22.63 FPG (8th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 83.5 rush YPG, 0.5 rush TDPG, 3.8 receptions PG, 21.8 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 17.28 FPG (4th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 11.8 RPG, 198.0 YPG, 1.5 TDPG, 40.90 FPG (3rd most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.5 RPG, 57.3 YPG, 0.3 TDPG, 12.73 FPG (15th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Ten) the Jets have looked less than average against the passing game. They have allowed the 5th most passing yards per game while giving up seven passing TDs to opposing QBs.

 

WRs are averaging 198.0 receiving yards a game (3rd most) and have gotten into the end zone six times over the last four games. In two of those contests, WRs totaled above 40.0 FP, including Mike Wallace and company who torched them for 18/230/2 for 53.0 FP. Additionally, receivers are reaching double digit receptions in three of their past four games.

 

The Jets have played well against RBs however. Gang Green has allowed just two TDs to the position and just 21.8 receiving yards per game (4th fewest). They’ve held the position to under 20.0 FP in three of their last four games, but did get run over by Marcel Reece and the Raiders rushing attack in Week Fourteen. Aside from that game, they’ve been very respectable against RBs.

 

While the team has been very average against TEs, it’s encouraging to note that they’ve allowed just 1 TD to the position over their last four games.

 

Next opponent: @ Carolina

 

Oakland Raiders:

·         Against opposing QBs: 245.8 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 0.6 INTPG, 19.74 FPG (12th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 109.8 rush YPG, 1.0 rush TDPG, 3.8 receptions PG, 25.6 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 23.34 FPG (15th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.2 RPG, 160.4 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 35.30 FPG (13th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.2 RPG, 59.8 YPG, 0.2 TDPG, 11.38 FPG (9th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five games, the Raiders defense has allowed two QBs to throw for more than 300 yards but has only allowed one of them to throw for multiple TDs, that man being Ryan Fitzpatrick in Week Twelve. Additionally, only 2 QBs have gone over the 300-yard passing mark in their last five games and only 2 QBs have totaled above 21.0 FP. They kept a pathetic Eli Manning to 10.7 FP in Week Ten and a solid Tony Romo to 15.2 in Week Thirteen.

 

The Oakland has done a decent job keeping RBs out of the end zone but they’re giving up 109.8 rushing yards per game, the 10th most in the league, and have allowed at least 4 receptions to the position in three of their last four games. The biggest blunder of the rushing defense came against the Cowboys, who put up 145 yards and 3 TDs for 43.6 FP.

 

WRs have been a bit of a problem for the Raiders as well. Over the last five games the opposition is averaging 13.2 catches each week, the 5th most in the league, and every teams’ WR corps in the last five weeks has totaled double-digit receptions, including a 17/257/2 for 54.7 FP performance by Kendall Wright and the Titan WRs in Week Twelve.

 

Their 9th fewest against TEs average could be much better, if not for Week Eleven against Houston, when Garrett Graham and the Texan TEs amassed 26.6 FP against them. Other than that game, no team’s TE has gone above 10.0 FP and the Giants’ TEs put up a big goose egg against the Raiders in Week Ten.

 

Next opponent: vs. Kansas City

 

Philadelphia Eagles:

·         Against opposing QBs: 254.8 YPG, 1.5 TDPG, 1.3 INTPG, 20.28 FPG (14th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 97.5 rush YPG, 0.3 rush TDPG, 3.8 receptions PG, 51.5 receiving YPG, 0.3 receiving TDPG, 21.65 FPG (12th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.0 RPG, 169.3 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 34.65 FPG (14th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 33.3 RPG, 34.0 YPG, 0.5 TDPG, 9.65 FPG (5th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Twelve) the Eagles have limited TEs to just 34.0 receiving yards a game, the 3rd fewest. Overall, Philly is allowing the 5th fewest FPG to the position. It’s been very up-and-down, however. The Green Bay TEs got them for 16.4 FP in Week Ten while Rob Housler and Jim Dray of the Cardinals got them for 16.7 FP in Week Thirteen. Yet in Weeks Eleven and Fourteen, the Eagles held the position to under 4.0 FP.

 

They’ve also done a good job against RBs. They’ve allowed just two TDs and are limiting backs to 3.8 receptions a week, the 8th fewest. RBs have been kept under 20.0 FP in two of their last four games, and only Washington’s attack surpassed 100 yards in that span. Additionally, they’ve allowed just 2 total RB TDs over the past four weeks, one on the ground and one in the air.

 

They’ve been in the middle of the pack WRs but the 13.0 receptions they’re allowing each week are disturbing. It could be worse, if not for the Snow Bowl, in which Megatron and company managed just 5/67 receiving for 11.7 FP. In the three games before that, receiving corps had totaled over 30.0 FP in each game and at least 200 yards receiving in two of those three.

 

Again, because of the Week Fourteen Winter Wonderland, the team’s stats against QBs are fairly respectable. But between Weeks Ten and Thirteen, QBs passed for 6 total TDs and scored above 25.0 FP in two of those three games.

 

Next opponent: @ Minnesota

 

Pittsburgh Steelers:

·         Against opposing QBs: 260.2 YPG, 1.6 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 21.52 FPG (14th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 80.8 rush YPG, 0.4 rush TDPG, 5.4 receptions PG, 34.4 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 19.32 FPG (9th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 12.2 RPG, 174.4 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 35.64 FPG (12th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.8 RPG, 51.4 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 13.54 FPG (13th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Pittsburgh defense has been slightly below average over the last five weeks in most categories. Two of the last five QBs they’ve faced have thrown for more than 330 passing yards. They’ve also given up eight passing TDs during that time. And even though they held Miami’s Ryan Tannehill to just 200 yards passing, he found the EZ 3 times and burned them for 56 yards rushing on just two carries.

 

WRs are doing average as well against Pitt. In Week Eleven, Lions WR Calvin Johnson caught six balls for 179 yards and two TDs. In Week Twelve, Brown WR Josh Gordon went off for 237 yards and a TD. The Steelers are allowing the 12th most FPG to the position, but that stat could be worse if not for the Bills game in Week Ten, when their receivers posted just 9/91 for 18.1 FP. In the three games after that, receiving corps have totaled at least 37.0 FP and double-digit receptions, including 21 in the record setting game by Gordon against Cleveland.

 

They’ve done well against RBs however, limiting the position to just 80.8 FPG, 8th fewest in the league. They’ve held rushing attacks to under 20.0 FP in three of their last five games and have allowed only one rusher, Lamar Miller in Week Fourteen, to break the 100-yard rushing mark. They can be vulnerable to RB receptions, though, as they allowed 5/71 receiving to Detroit’s RBs and 9/42 to Baltimore’s.

 

The biggest game that stands out for the Steelers against the TE came just last week against Miami, when they allowed Charles Clay and the Miami TEs to total 30.4 FP. No TE reached 10.0 FP in the previous three games and no TE went over 50 yards in the previous four games

 

Next opponent: vs. Cincinnati

 

San Diego Chargers:

·         Against opposing QBs: 268.2 YPG, 2.0 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 21.94 FPG (11th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 105.4 rush YPG, 1.0 rush TDPG, 4.2 receptions PG, 29.6 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 23.70 FPG (16th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.2 RPG, 186.6 YPG, 1.2 TDPG, 39.16 FPG (6th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.0 RPG, 52.0 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 14.00 FPG (11th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Chargers are allowing the 6th most FPG to WRs due in part to the amount of receptions they give up. The 13.2 receptions they’re allowing per game are the 4th most in the league. Additionally, receivers have gone for over 150 yards in each of the last five games and have totaled over 49.0 FP in two of their last five. And while they did hold Demaryius Thomas, Eric Decker, and Wes Welker to 13/181 combined, those receivers found the end zone 3 times.

 

San Diego has also struggled recently against the QB position. Opposing signal callers are averaging 268.2 yards per week (7th most) while throwing ten TDs in the last five weeks. However, those numbers are due to a Peyton Manning output of 32.4 FP in Week Ten and an Alex Smith output of 26.4 FP in Week Twelve. In the other three games, QBs haven’t reached 20.0 FP or tossed for more than a single TD in each game.

 

Against TEs, the Chargers have really been hurting and it could be worse, if not for a 1/9 receiving game by Cincy TEs in Week Thirteen. That game aside, all other teams in their previous five games have gone for at least 12.0 FP, and two have broken the 20.0 FP mark.

 

Next opponent: @ Denver

 

San Francisco 49ers:

·         Against opposing QBs: 203.6 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 13.80 FPG (fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 87.4 rush YPG, 0.6 rush TDPG, 3.4 receptions PG, 20.0 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 17.74 FPG (5th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.0 RPG, 145.6 YPG, 0.2 TDPG, 28.96 FPG (9th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 3.0 RPG, 38.0 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 9.20 FPG (4th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Niners have been among the league’s best defense ranking in the top 10 in all categories. Four of the last five QBs they’ve faced have been held to less than 220 passing yards. In addition they’ve allowed just three passing TDs during that time. Only one QB, Drew Brees, has passed for over 300 yards, and no QB has had a multiple TD pass game against them. More impressively, not a single QB in their last five games has managed 20.0 FP. As the word suggests above, QBs have truly been getting the “fewest” production against the Niners.

 

WRs have caught just one TDs while being held to 145.6 yards per game (14th fewest) over the last five weeks against the 49ers, however, each of those teams’ receiving corps have reached double-digit receptions. We also must keep in mind that the best receivers the Niners have had to face over the last five weeks have been Marques Colston and Pierre Garcon. They haven’t had to deal with any Megatron or Gordon types.

 

TEs caught two TDs but they’re catching just 3 balls a week, the second fewest in the league. Washington’s TEs were held catchless against them in Week Twelve and Carolina’s TEs were held to just one catch in Week Ten.

 

Opposing RBs are averaging just 20.0 receiving yards per game, the 2nd fewest in the league and have scored just three TDs. The Niners would be even better statistically against RBs, but Darren Sproles, Pierre Thomas, and the NO rushing attack did get them for 93 yards rushing and 11/61 receiving. Aside from that game, no team’s rushing attack has managed 20.0 FP, and in their last three games, the Niners haven’t allowed a rushing attack to break the 15.0 FP mark.

 

Next opponent: @ Tampa Bay

 

St. Louis Rams:

·         Against opposing QBs: 329.3 YPG, 1.3 TDPG, 1.3 INTPG, 22.48 FPG (9th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 58.0 rush YPG, 1.0 rush TDPG, 7.8 receptions PG, 78.0 receiving YPG, 0.3 receiving TDPG, 28.85 (5th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 16.0 RPG, 188.5 YPG, 0.5 TDPG, 37.95 FPG (8th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.5 RPG, 62.8 YPG, 0.5 TDPG, 13.78 FPG (12th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Rams have been awful against RBs over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week 11). Opposing RBs have gotten into the end zone five times but what’s even more alarming is the receiving yardage they have racked up. St Louis is allowing 78.0 receiving yards a game to the position, the most in the league. It’s worth pointing out, though, that the Rams are allowing just 58.0 rushing yards per game, the fewest in the league. They just simply can’t keep them out of the EZ. Additionally, Indy’s RBs and Chicago’s RBs both had double-digit receptions.

 

QBs are also having success against St. Louis averaging, 329.3 passing yards per game, 2nd most. However, in their last two games, Colin Kaepernick and Carson Palmer were held to under 20.0 FP and only passed for a single TD each.

 

As a result of the QB success, WRs are catching 16 balls a game (most) and averaging 188.5 receiving yards (5th most). In Week Twelve, Josh McCown’s targets totaled 22/217/1 for a whopping 50.1 FP. The only redeeming quality in St. Louis’ defense against receivers is that they’ve only allowed 2 TDs to the position in their last four games.

 

In the last three games, the Rams have struggled with TEs, allowing over 13.0 FP in their last three games and over 16.0 FP in two of their last three. Additionally, TEs have scored in two of their last three games.

 

Next Opponent: vs. New Orleans

 

Seattle Seahawks:

·         Against opposing QBs: 175.3 YPG, 1.3 TDPG, 1.0 INTPG, 14.90 FPG (2nd fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 89.5 rush YPG, 0.0 rush TDPG, 7.3 receptions PG, 39.8 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 20.18 FPG (11th fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 9.0 RPG, 92.5 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 22.75 FPG (fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 3.5 RPG, 43.0 YPG, 0.5 TDPG, 10.80 FPG (6th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Seahawks pass defense over the last five weeks (four games…bye in Week Twelve) has been amazing. Each of the last four QBs who faced the Seahawks have thrown for less than 210 passing yards, including Drew Brees and Matt Ryan. Additionally, no QB has totaled over 20.0 FP in that span and three out of the four QBs, including Brees and Ryan, failed to reach the 200-yard passing mark.

 

Because of this, opposing WRs are averaging just 92.5 receiving yards a game (fewest in the NFL) and 9.0 receptions per game (2nd fewest). Only two teams’ receivers eclipsed the 100-yard receiving mark and the Seahawks have not allowed a TD to the position in their last two games.

 

Even TEs are being shut down by Seattle. The Seahawks are allowing the 7th fewest receiving yards (43.0) and the 6th fewest receptions to the position (3.5). However, they have allowed the position to score in back-to-back weeks, but let’s give them a break—it was against Jimmy Graham and Vernon Davis.

 

Against the running game the Seahawks have been above average. An opposing RB hasn’t gotten into the end zone in the last five weeks neither in the ground nor through the air. Additionally, only two rushing attacks in the past five weeks has gone above 20.0 FP. However, they have allowed double-digit receptions to the position in two of the last four weeks, and when they’re keeping RBs in check through the air, they have allowed over 100 yards rushing to the position. Like it says in the first sentence here, they’ve been average against RBs.

 

Next opponent: @ New York Giants

 

Tampa Bay Buccaneers:

·         Against opposing QBs: 245.4 YPG, 1.8 TDPG, 2.6 INTPG, 22.82 FPG (7th most)

·         Against opposing RBs: 76.2 rush YPG, 0.2 rush TDPG, 4.8 receptions PG, 33.4 receiving YPG, 0.0 receiving TDPG, 16.96 FPG (2nd fewest)

·         Against opposing WRs: 13.0 RPG, 170.2 YPG, 1.4 TDPG, 38.76 FPG (7th most)

·         Against opposing TEs: 4.8 RPG, 48.6 YPG, 0.4 TDPG, 12.06 FPG (12th fewest)

 

Inside the Numbers:

Over the last five weeks the Tampa defense has struggled mightily against the pass, despite giving up an average amount of passing yards. Opposing QBs have thrown nine TDs against the Bucs in the last five games. They’ve given up multiple passing TDs in four of their last five outings. However, they have amassed an astounding 13 interceptions in their last five games, and are coming off a great game, in which Bill QB EJ Manuel totaled just 12.1 FP.

 

Tampa has also struggled against WRs allowing 13.0 receptions per game, the 7th most. In addition, WRs have scored seven TDs in the last five games. However, since Miami’s WRs put up 51.2 FP against them in Week Ten, numbers have been steadily decreasing, as the Bucs allowed 43.5 FP to WRs in Week Eleven, 33.4 FP to WRs in Week Thirteen and 18.9 in Week Fourteen.

 

Tampa has done very well against RBs, though. In the last five games opposing RBs are averaging just 76.2 rushing yards per game, the 7th fewest. They have allowed just 1 TD on the ground in that span and none in the air. In their last 3 games, no rushing attack has excelled 20.0 FP, and they could have the title of “fewest in the past five weeks” if not for Week Eleven, when Steven Jackson and the Atlanta rushing attack went for 152 yards and a TD on the ground with 6/43 receiving for 31.5 FP.

 

Next opponent: vs. San Francisco

 

Tennessee Titans:

·         Against opposing QBs: 253.8 YPG, 1.0 TDPG, 0.8 INTPG, 19.44 FPG (10th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 95.2 rush YPG, 1.4 rush TDPG, 7.2 receptions PG, 57.8 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 32.10 FPG (3rd most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 9.6 RPG, 131.0 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 26.08 FPG (4th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.6 RPG, 65.0 YPG, 0.2 TDPG, 13.30 FPG (16th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Titans have been very good against WRs limiting them to the 5th fewest receptions per game (9.6) and just three TDs over the last five weeks. In fact, they have kept opposing WRs under 20.0 FP in four of their last five games. The only exception came last week, when Peyton Manning’s targets burned them for 20/266/3 and 64.6 FP. The previous four WR corps hadn’t totaled more than 9 receptions, including games against Cecil Shorts and Andrew Luck’s attack.

 

They had kept QBs under control as well until their Week Fourteen matchup when Broncos QB Peyton Manning threw for 397 and four TDs. In the four previous games the Titans had allowed just one TD and limited all the QBs they faced to less than 260 passing yards.

 

Opposing RBs have scored eight TDs against Tennessee in the last five weeks and are averaging 57.8 receiving yards a game, 5th most. The 7.2 receptions per game allowed to RBs by the Titans are the 5th most in the league. If you have a pass catching RB going against the Titans you better start him.

 

While the Titans defense against TEs is right smack in the middle, they’re doing much better than what the stats say, as they have limited TEs to under 10.0 FP in three of their last five games. Coby Fleener and the Indy TEs got them for 20.8 FP in Week Eleven, and Julius Thomas and the Denver TEs got them for 25.0 FP in Week Fourteen.

 

Next opponent: vs. Arizona

 

Washington Redskins:

·         Against opposing QBs: 228.6 YPG, 1.6 TDPG, 0.6 INTPG, 20.70 FPG (16th fewest)

·         Against opposing RBs: 96.6 rush YPG, 1.6 rush TDPG, 3.2 receptions PG, 32.0 receiving YPG, 0.2 receiving TDPG, 26.86 FPG (11th most)

·         Against opposing WRs: 9.8 RPG, 125.0 YPG, 0.8 TDPG, 27.10 FPG (7th fewest)

·         Against opposing TEs: 5.0 RPG, 71.6 YPG, 0.6 TDPG, 15.76 FPG (4th most)

 

Inside the Numbers:

The Redskins have been destroyed by TEs over the last five weeks of the season. They have given up a TD in three of the last five games and are allowing 71.6 receiving yards a game to the position, the 4th most. Additionally, TEs have broken the 20.0 FP mark in three of their previous four games.

 

They’ve done a good job against WRs though, allowing the 7th fewest receptions per game (9.8). Additionally, no receiving corps has gone over 140 yards in the last five games or made over 11 receptions.

 

Washington hasn’t given up an extraordinary amount of yardage to RBs but they’re allowing the 11th most FPG to the position because of the nine TDs they have allowed over the last five weeks. They’re coming off an absolutely abysmal performance in which they allowed Jamaal Charles and Knile Davis to gain 189 yards and 2 TDs on the ground as well as a receiving TD for 42.4 FP.

 

Though the stats indicate that the Redskins defense is very average against QBs, they’re coming off back-to-back games in which the opposing QB hasn’t gone above 17.0 FP or passed for more than 250 yards. Then again, those QBs were Eli Manning and Alex Smith.

 

Next opponent: @ Atlanta

 

 

 

 

 

 

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